Research

DISSERTATION
Civil War, Social Networks, and Women in Politics.
My dissertation, now a book manuscript, investigates the complex relationship between armed violence and women’s political empowerment. I argue that where civil war violence undermines existing women’s associations, women will construct new female networks that are less hierarchical and culturally constrained than their predecessors. This, in turn, can facilitate broader cooperation, political awareness, and collective action among women in a post-war context.

WORKING PAPERS
“The First Political Order and Its Effects on National Security and Stability,” with Valerie Hudson, Donna Lee Bowen, and Lynne Nielsen, presented at the annual conference of the International Studies Association in Baltimore,
MD, February 24, 2017.

“Political Order, Household Formation, and Demographics,” with Valerie Hudson, Donna Lee Bowen, and Lynne Nielsen, presented at the annual conference of the International Studies Association in Atlanta, GA, March 18, 2016.

“Development NGOs and the Decline of the Women’s Movement in Post-war Sierra Leone,” presented at the annual conference of the American Political Science Association in San Francisco, CA, September 4, 2015.

“The Quota Quotient: Advocacy and Statistical Practice in the Literature on Minority Political Quotas.”

“Between Invention and Tradition: Poro and Kamajor Militias in Sierra Leone and Liberia.”

PUBLICATIONS
2011. “Women in the Post-Conflict Period.” With Mary Caprioli and Valerie Hudson. In Peace and Conflict 2010, eds. Joseph Hewitt, Jonathan Wilkenfeld and Ted Robert Gurr. Center for International Development and Management. 91-102.

2007. “Political Push Factors in Emigration: A Comparative Analysis,” Sigma: Journal of Political and International Studies: Vol. 25, Article 4.